Tag Archives: Schedule

How do you schedule tasks in a project?

How do you decide what tasks to schedule first: the complex ones or the easy ones? the short ones or the long ones? the risky ones or the sure-shot ones? Most often, this task sequence is determined by hard logic, soft logic, or some other external constraints. However, how do you decide when there are no such contraints?

If we look at the risk driving the project lifecycle and scheduling, then it is natural to expect high-risk tasks being tackled at the start just so that we are systematically driving down risks in the project and achieve higher certainty levels as we get close to the project. However, it seems inconceivable that someone will cherry-pick the easy tasks first and leave all high-risk ones for the end! Clearly, that is setting up the project for a grand finale of all sorts!

Project SchedulingCould complexity be a good measure then? What will happen if we take high complex tasks first? Surely, that will lead to tackling some of the most difficult problems first, and there might also be a high level of correlation between complexity and risk. So, taking this approach is also likely to significantly lower a project risks. However, not all tasks are created equal. It is likely that high-risk tasks not the longest, so while the project makes appreciable gains in lowering the risk, but doesn’t make a whole lot of progress.

Agile approaches, Scrum in particular, rely on driving the tasks that make biggest sense to the customer – tasks that deliver maximum value to the customer. However, there is no guarantee that this will help lower the project risks, or manage the schedule better. Similarly, Kanban helps manage tasks but doesn’t really spell out how they should be scheduled.

So, what is the best approach?

I read an interesting blog, The Art of the Self-Imposed Deadline, where I specially liked this one from the blog post:

3. Avoid the curse of the “final push.” Scope and sequence a project so that each part is shorter than the one that precedes it. Feeling the work units shrink as you go gives you a tangible sense of progress and speeds you toward the end. When you leave the long parts for last, you’re more likely to get worn out before you finish. Besides, if you’re “dead at the deadline,” those other projects you’re juggling will stagnate.

This seems like a very practical suggestion – often the tendancy is to ‘cherry pick’ while scheduling the tasks – we tend to pick up tasks that are favorite to people, or appear to be easier to take up. However, very often, we end up taking more time, and project gets delayed. If the tasks are scheduled such that big/complex tasks are scheduled first, that might mitigate lot of risk pertaining to last-minute issues (could be due to underestimation, or integration issues, etc.). However, I am not 100% sure that purely scheduling tasks on “longest-task first” basis is the best policy to lower risks in a project. Shouldn’t we be using a combination of top-risk items that are longest?

I haven’t used this approach yet, but seems like something to try. How about you – what’s your favorite way to schedule tasks?